Reminding You of Your Power to Get What You Want

Your core values can help you get what you want, but it's not always an easy path. Get started on the right foot by keeping these nine things in mind.

Humans—we all have something in common: figuring out how to get what we want. Our basic needs and desires lead our list of priorities. Some of what we need is concrete and some is abstract. But in reality, we want to be happy and healthy.

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    We all have the power to get what we want. But figuring out the next step to how we get what we want, whatever that may be is our daily work—achieving our business goals, managing our households, staying present in personal relationships Our values guide us, but it isn’t always smooth sailing. Most of us try to get what we want by doing the right thing according to our values.   Our values guide our steps as we make choices.  It is important to pay attention to the values you live by and make decisions by verses those you may aspire to.  It is our core values that create the container by which we operate and our choices are shaped.

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    The line between right and wrong is often gray and complex these days.  Those who have the belief that resources are limited are challenged to get their share.  Those who believe that there are unlimited resources, have more options and creative ways to move forward to get what they want within their personal value system. They have more opportunities to be open, generous and gracious to others.

    Our thinking plays a huge part in our experience. .   As human beings we have created everything in our modern world.  All of these creations started with a thought.  As much as it doesn’t always feel like it, we have the opportunity to use our thoughts to create our world anew each day by the choices we make and each action we take.  We can create a world that is more suited to our best and highest self, one thought, one action at a time.

    The Technology of “doing, creating and being” helps you incorporate this powerful concept and other spiritual practices into your everyday life so you can manifest what you want. This technology will help you create a life where you are healthy, happy, and whole; moving you steadily on your journey of self-mastery.

    There are nine human technologies that support us to manifest what we want in the immediate. These technologies are:

    • thought
    • vision
    • self-awareness
    • scanning
    • strategy
    • consistent action
    • relationship
    • listening; and
    • obedience.

    Click here to learn more about how these nine ideas can help you get what you want by watching my webinar (login registration required.)

    Monika Moss-Gransberry is the president of MKM Management Consulting.


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    Next up: Resisting 'CuSpeak' Is Futile

    Resisting 'CuSpeak' Is Futile

    As a business owner (and therefore a salesperson), a main goal is to effectively communicate with customers and prospects. It’s not just a matter of speaking, but rather a matter of taking into consideration the five elements of speech explored in this article when you communicate. Give it a try!

    In his still-frightening classic dystopian novel, 1984, George Orwell invented “NewSpeak”, the official language of Oceania used to control communication and thought.  

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    So, let me pay homage to Orwell by inventing “CuSpeak” in his honor, the official language we should always use when speaking to customers and prospects and not nearly as creepy as “NewSpeak.” While it’s much harder to learn than “SAE” (Standard American English), it’s much more effective in influencing how our audience understands and views us.

    Here are five reasons why CuSpeak is superior to SAE when it comes to your business.

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    Reason No. 1: CuSpeak is reader-centric.

    Too many small businesses still communicate with customers using a “writer-centric” dialect. It’s what they speak and are comfortable using. But few, if any, customers speak their dialect. So, the result is often miscommunication or annoying the very people they want to influence.

    Because CuSpeak is totally reader-centric, it embraces Dr. Tony Alessandra’s “Platinum Rule” concept and communicates with customers the way customers want to be communicated with. That’s the total opposite of their archaic Golden Rule approach—communicating with customers the way they want customers to communicate back with them.

    Using the Golden Rule requires little assessment and no adaptation. CuSpeak must be individualized, based on the specific customer’s industry background, organizational and educational level and preferred communication style. Mastering it demands time, effort and analysis—often in short supply with most small businesses.

    Reason No. 2: CuSpeak is buzzword-free.

    CuSpeak doesn’t use buzzwords because they may be too specific to the particular small business. Instead, it prefers a simple word or phrase that clearly, consistently and universally has the same meaning as the buzzword.

    If the airlines bought into this concept, they wouldn’t use the buzzword “deplane” but the more universally understood “exit the plane” or “leave.” Companies wouldn’t escalate” a problem, but “take it to the next level of (management or procedure).” Lawyers wouldn’t “execute” a contract, but simply “sign and date” it.   

    Reason No. 3: CuSpeak is acronym free.

    Acronyms are words created from the first letters of a name, like ABBA (Agnetha, Bjorn, Benny, Annifrid) or group of words, like radar (radio detecting and ranging) that are pronounced as words. They’ve been around since the Roman Empire but came into popular use with the government or military, two institutions not known for effective customer communication. If you want to know for sure, look it up in the FAT (Federal Acronym and Terms) book. Really—I’m not making this up.

    Your industry or business has lots of acronyms. So does your customer’s business, but they’re different. In CuSpeak, you minimize their use and always spell them out the first time. So, a marketing proposal may include BOGO (buy one get one) promotions, a pitch from an accountant might mention RITA (Regional Income Tax Administration) or a real estate development might mention NIMBY (not in my back yard). The parenthetical definitions take up minimal space and add subtle and convenient value.

    Some words look like acronyms but are spoken as a string of letters, like FYI, R&D, Q&A or FAQ. While most of these are generally understood, you should define unusual ones by going beyond simply putting words to letter. For example, B&HU (Best & Highest Use) means the best return on investment for your time or resource, PBX (Private Branch Exchange) is telecom talk for switchboard and EBITDA (Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization) refers to current operating profitability.

    Reason No. 4: CuSpeak is vague-free.

    CuSpeak is known for clarity. Simple, specific words rarely cause as much miscommunication for customers as vague references. So, opt for clarity wherever possible. Just so we’re clear, here are some examples.

    • “By Friday at 5” is better than “in a few days” or “ASAP.”
    • “Five complaints from three suppliers since Monday” is better than “a lot of complaints from some customers lately.”
    • If the project will cost $5,950, then say “$5,950” instead of “about/around $5,900” unless you need to indicate a range, such as “$5,800 - $6,100.”
    • Some vague references look like they’re hiding the truth. Isn’t “over plan by 27.6%” clearer and more honest than “more than a little bit over plan.”

    Reason No. 5: CuSpeak is lame-free.

     I use “lame” here to refer to ineffective style—using big words, wordy phrases or passive voice. CuSpeak doesn’t allow any of that—and I’m so glad. Check out the examples below.

    • “Telephone” becomes “phone,” “compensate” becomes “pay,” “finalize” becomes “finish,” and “modification” becomes “change”all with no loss of clarity or meaning.
    • Turn “fluctuation” into “change,” “commence” into “begin” and “utilize into “use.”
    • Instead of adding four words with “to the extent that,” only add one with “if.” Instead of “each and every one of you,” save three words with “each of you.”
    • There is no need to say ‘a check in the amount of $2,300’ when ‘a check for $2,300’ works better. And ‘at this present point in time.’ Is no clearer than ‘now.’
    • Avoid the redundant “consensus of opinion” when “consensus” means the same thing. Why ever say “red in color” when all we need is “red?”
    • CuSpeak loves active voice—it’s shorter, simpler and more conversational than passive voice. So, “The deadline will be determined” becomes “I/We/Anne will determine the deadline, ‘I/We/Hector will share the results Monday” is better than “The results will be shared Monday” and “I/We/Sue appreciate(s) your help” is more conversational than ‘Your help is appreciated.’

    By now, it should be obvious that resisting CuSpeak is futile and stupid. Embracing it is a great strategy for differentiating your business from the competitors who don’t get it yet. It’s well worth the time and effort to become fluent. So, try it and let me know how well it worked for you.

    Phil Stella runs Effective Training & Communication, www.communicate-confidently.com,440-449-0356, and empowers business leaders to reduce the pain with workplace communication. A popular trainer and executive coach on writing, styles and sales presentations, he is also on the Cleveland faculty of the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program.  


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    Next up: Selling to the CIO Part 1

    Selling to the CIO Part 1

    Tom Lucas, CIO of Sherwin-Williams, George Mehok, CIO of Revol Wireless and Pete Regan, Director with IBM share their insight into getting the attention of, and selling to, CIOs.

    Tom Lucas, CIO of Sherwin-Williams, George Mehok, CIO of Revol Wireless and Pete Regan, Director with IBM share their insight into getting the attention of, and selling to, CIOs.

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    Next up: Selling to the CIO Part 2

    Selling to the CIO Part 2

    This is part 2 of our Selling to the CIO session featuring Tom Lucas (Sherwin-Williams), George Mehok (Revol) and Pete Reagan (IBM).

    This is part 2 of our Selling to the CIO session featuring Tom Lucas (Sherwin-Williams), George Mehok (Revol) and Pete Reagan (IBM).

    Listen here.

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    Next up: Strategic Implications of the Chief Digital Officer

    Strategic Implications of the Chief Digital Officer

    What are the strategic implications of the role of Chief Digital Officer and how does it affect your company and your strategies? Is this a role that needs to be developed at your company? 

    Information roles in companies are constantly evolving; in fact the very existence of the CIO role evolved out of changes in business technologies many years ago. Rapidly advancing changes in information technology, particularly around digital connections to customers, partners, vendors and more has led to a new role: Chief Digital Officer. 

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    What are the strategic implications of the role of Chief Digital Officer and how does it affect your company and your strategies? Is this a role that needs to be developed at your company? 

    Paul Stefanuk, partner with Paul-Lawrence, a national executive search firm, shares insight into this developing role. What industries are embracing this change? Where does it fit organizationally? How does the role drive enterprise performance and how does it interface with traditional information technology operations?

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    Next up: The 3 'I's' of Leadership

    The 3 'I's' of Leadership

    There are so many different views and perspectives on leadership—so many that I sometimes wonder how anyone is supposed to discern the essentials. At the same time, it’s important to have some leadership foundations that you can use to build your own leadership model, and the simpler the better. Enter the three “I’s” of leadership:

    There are so many different views and perspectives on leadership—so many that I sometimes wonder how anyone is supposed to discern the essentials. At the same time, it’s important to have some leadership foundations that you can use to build your own leadership model, and the simpler the better. Enter the three “I’s” of leadership:

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    • Intention
    • Influence
    • Impact

    With clarity around these three leadership “I’s” you will have a firm foundation for whatever leadership role you’re playing, no matter the arena where you’re serving as a leader.

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    Intention—Leaders are intentional. Leaders live and lead on purpose. They are thoughtful and discerning when it comes to who they are and what they’re seeking to achieve. History has shown us that leaders can influence people, but often their leadership is more about playing a role than purposefully creating outcomes and impacts. In other words, these leaders use their influence without thoughtful intentions. If you want to be an effective leader, being intentional in all aspects of your leadership will serve you (and those you serve) well.

    Influence—Leadership is about influence, and the essence of influence is being a person that people want to follow. It means engaging people behind a cause, mission, vision, purpose or values. Influence is the outcome of being authentic as a leader, which allows you to build the deep levels of trust that draw people to you, engage people and commit them to being a part of your plan and vision.

    Impact—Leadership is about impact, not actions. Leaders are acutely focused on their desired impact (beyond goals and objectives), and impact equates to creating something long-lasting. While some “leaders” are focused on their personal agendas and legacy, true leaders are focused on organizational, institutional, community and global legacy.

    What about you?

    Will you be intentional? Are you committed to being the kind of person and leader that people will trust and want to follow? What’s your “why” as a leader (personally and professionally), and is your “why” more about impact than outcomes?

    These might seem like easy questions and they are, but only if you’re willing to be authentic, vulnerable and honest in assessing yourself. Many so-called leaders never even ask these questions, let alone honestly answer them. Many leaders claim to desire feedback from others (often the best source of honest perspectives and the best way for identifying blind spots), yet they never take action on the feedback—believing they already are the leader they want to be. We live in a world where leadership is often defined by effectiveness, rather than impact. Where leaders are judged more on their ability to be decisive than on their willingness to be vulnerable. Based upon the state of affairs in our world, it’s time for a change—time for a new type of leader. Authentic, vulnerable and courageous!

    In the end, leadership is a choice, and the three “I’s” outlined above are individual choices that collectively represent that larger choice. Once that choice is made, you can commit to these three I’s in order to be the type of leader that makes a difference with people, in organizations, in businesses, in initiatives and in the community.  The time is now—time for a new type of leader who is focused on intention, influence and impact. Will you choose to embrace the “I’s” of leadership?

    Join me on Tuesday, June 21st at the COSE Business Boot Camp as we take a dive into what it means to be an authentic leader and the impact authentic leaders can unleash. No matter your title or role, this session will help you tap into a whole other level of personal and professional leadership.

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